King Arthur

Do you enjoy stories of heroic battles, quests, gallant knights, magic, and family drama? It doesn’t get much better than the legends of King Arthur. Here are a few retellings of the original tales, as well as new stories featuring King Arthur, his knights of the Round Table, his enemies and more!
The Book of Mordred by Vivian Vande Velde (J Fiction Vande Velde)

In the long tradition of Arthurian legend, Mordred has been characterized as a buffoon, a false knight, and a bloodthirsty traitor. The Book of Mordred reveals a mysterious man through the eyes of three women who love him.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (398.2 MOR)

Think yourself back in years, my friends. . . . It’s New Year’s Eve in Camelot, where King Arthur, Queen Guinevere, and all their good Knights wait breathlessly for an extravagant feast to begin. Suddenly, a strange and frightening Knight bursts into the hall — a giant of a man, green from head to toe, who mockingly challenges the Court to a shocking game. Only the chivalrous Sir Gawain dares to take on the hideous Green Knight. But over the unexpected course of his test, will Gawain prove as brave and honest as he’d like to believe?

Gerald Morris:

The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf

  • Her castle under siege by an evil knight who keeps beheading all her would-be rescuers, Lady Lynet realizes the only way to get help is to get it herself. So one night she slips away and strikes out for King Arthur’s court where she hopes to find a gallant knight to vanquish the Knight of the Red Lands and free her castle. Gerald Morris’s latest Arthurian novel is a highly comic tale of hidden identities, mysterious knights, faeries and enchantments, damsels-in-distress, and true love.

The Ballad of Sir Dinadan

  • Young Dinadan has no wish to joust or quest or save damsels in distress or do any of the knightly things expected of him. He’d rather be a minstrel, playing his rebec and writing ballads. But he was born to be a knight, and knights, of course, have adventures. So after his father forces his knighthood upon him, he wanders toward King Arthur’s court, in the company of a misguided young Welsh lad named Culloch. There Dinadan meets Sir Kai and Sir Bedivere, and the three find themselves accompanying Culloch on the worst sort of quest.

The Lioness and Her Knight

  • Luneta is tired of living in dull Orkney with her mother and father (who happens to be the most boring knight of King Arthur’s Round Table). She prides herself on always getting what she wants, so when the opportunity presents itself, she jumps at the chance to stay at a family friend’s castle near Camelot. Her handsome cousin, Sir Ywain -a young knight seeking adventure-arrives just in time to escort her to King Arthur’s court. Along the way they pick up a knight-turned-fool named Rhience, whose wit and audacity set many a puffed-up personality in its place. Before arriving at Lady Laudine’s castle, the trio stops at Camelot, where they hear the story of the Storm Stone, a magical object deep in the forest that soon sweeps everyone into a web of love, betrayal, and more than a bit of magic.

The Quest of the Fair Unknown

  • On her deathbed, Beaufils’s mother leaves him with a quest and a clue: find your father, a knight of King Arthur’s court. So Beaufils leaves the isolated forest of his youth and quickly discovers that he has much to learn about the world beyond his experience. Beaufils’s innocence never fails to make his companions grin, but his fresh outlook on the world’s peculiarities turns out to be more of a gift than a curse as they encounter unexpected friends and foes.
Lancelot (398.20942)

Lancelot is welcomed into the court of King Arthur as a valiant fighter and later rescues Queen Guinevere, fights the tournament at Astolat, and pursues other adventures.

Merlin and the Dragons by Jane Yolen (Easy YOL)

When young Arthur is troubled by dreams, Merlin tells him a story about a fatherless boy who himself dreamed about dragons and the defeat of the evil king Vortigern.

The World of King Arthur and His Court: People, Places, Legend and Lore (942.014 CRO)

Questions about King Arthur abound: Did King Arthur really exist? What was he like? Where exactly was his kingdom? This mixture of legend, anecdote, fact, and speculation frames the answers to such questions by showing that in the long run they may not be all that important. Sifting through both literary and historical sources, Kevin Crossley-Holland illuminates the essential aspects of King Arthur’s chivalrous world that have kept people returning to it for inspiration and entertainment down through the ages.

Young Arthur (398.2 SAN)

To protect his life, Arthur, son of King Uther, was hidden from the court when still a baby. Growing up in Sir Ector’s household, Arthur knew nothing of his noble birth. Then one day at a tournament, he forgot to bring a sword for his brother, Kay. Looking for a replacement, Arthur saw a strange sword plunged into a stone. From the moment he released the famous sword he assumed his destiny as the rightful King of England. But there were still battles to be fought, and with Merlin’s help and the famous Excalibur at his side, Arthur established a reign of nobility, justice, and wisdom whose fame has lasted to the present day.

The Young Merlin Trilogy (J Fiction Yolen):

Passager (see also sequels Hobby and Merlin)

A boy is abandoned in the woods of medieval England. A year passes–a year of terror and hunger, of sleeping in trees and foraging for food, of outrunning packs of wild dogs–until one day a falconer captures and tames the boy as he would any passager, a young bird caught in the wild and trained. The falconer adopts the boy and teaches him all of the things he’s forgotten, including the boy’s true name–and the legacy of magic that will be his when he comes of age.

Compiled by Jennifer in Reference.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s